Are your teens talking about their challenges?

Good Morning! Here’s the Monday Morning Blog.

How was your week? Mine was busy but good. I spent part of it working on business and writing goals. It’s amazing how important your mindset is to getting things accomplished and achieving the goals you set for yourself. My dream has been to become a best-selling novelist. It will happen someday I don’t know how and I don’t know when. However, with the online course I took through the Facebook group, All-In Entrepreneur, the past couple of weeks I learned some great skills which will help me focus my time and energy towards it.

Jim and I went on a mini road trip this weekend. We drove to Red Wing, MN and visited Fair Trade Books, an independent bookstore owned and run by Rick DeVoe and his staff. He was a gracious host while we were there. We not only bought a couple of books we were looking for, but he suggested one for me and one for Jim after asking us about what kinds of things we liked to read. He pulled out a couple of really good sounding options. Especially for Jim, an aircraft mechanic and pilot who loves to learn about how things work, was offered a copy of a repair manual for a Sopwith Camel.

What is a Sopwith Camel youmay ask? Well, it is a British World War I single seat biplane fighter introduced in 1917. It‘s also the airplane that Snoopy flies when he pretends to kill the Red Baron in a dog fight.

Be sure you support your local independent book sellers. There’s a website where you can buy your books online called Bookshop.org. You can select an independent bookseller and they will receive credit for your purchase. As of this morning, Bookshop.org has raised $5,830,300.86 for local bookstores. Here is a link Bookshop.org

Teen Challenges – Are they talking to you or not?

In my writing recently, I’ve been changing the words teen issues to teen challenges. An issue is defined as an important topic or problem for debate or discussion. Challenge is defined as a task or situation that tests someone’s abilities. Issues seem to get talked about a lot, but not always have something done about them. I like the active nature of the definition of challenge. Teens face the challenge of dealing with things like peer pressure, bullying, and the changes brought on by the pandemic we are currently dealing with.

We are all facing changes in our lives due to the COVID virus, staying at home more, cancelling and rescheduling events, wearing masks when we go to public places like restaurants and work, and doing more things virtually, including school and talking to friends. Two big things which are normal activities for teenagers. Do you really know how your teen is doing during this very different time? Is your teen talking to you about how they feel? Not just about COVID, but other things that may be affecting them?

The coming of COVID has given all of us a chance to spend more time with our families. I know for me it has been nice to have dinners with my young adult kids. We have also had more talks since we are more available. Many of those opportunities were lost before when everyone was so busy with their activities or focusing on their smart phones for answers and interactions.

Speaking of smart phones, teens tend to find a lot of their advice through the internet on their phones. As we all know, the internet isn’t always the most accurate place to get information from. I’ve looked to the internet for answers myself and have wound up getting anxious from the many different answers there were. And each one wound up being a little bit off from the truth. Why not direct teens toward sources of information that we know have the right information? Or engage with them to be comfortable enough to come to their parents, teachers and trusted adults to get answers? To get our teens more engaged with us, it may take some creative solutions about reading certain books or using more accurate websites for them to reach out to. Or have them journal about their feelings through writing prompts.

An author friend of mine, Stephenie Peterson, is a homeschool mom who is posting daily writing prompts for kids on her Instagram and Facebook pages. What a great and maybe non-threatening way to get teens to open up and think about the challenge they are having and write down how they feel. It is along the lines of why psychiatrists have kids draw out what happened and interpret the drawing. How about doing these prompts as part of our current homeschooling or online learning to get teens to open up? Here is the writing prompt Stephenie posted on July 14th,

She posts them during the week. Be sure to check them out! Here are the links. Stephenie Peterson Author – Facebook and Stephenie Peterson Author – Instagram. She’s also an author of three books written for the middle grade audience. In two of her books, her main character is Nellie Nova, a young girl who goes on adventures back into history. And, her third, and most recently released one is called Grace’s Ghosts, which I am planning to do a review of soon, so keep an eye out for it on my blog. Here’s a link to her Amazon profile for more information about her books Stephenie Wilson-Peterson – Amazon Profile

Or, how about taking a look at my book, The Hard Way? It looks at the challenges of facing peer pressure and choosing the right friends. It’s a great coming of age novel to mentor teens with the story of how one teen navigates these challenges. Here’s the link to my website to take you to Amazon to get a copy for that preteen or young adult in your life. The Hard Way

Or, reach out to your local book store through Bookshop.org and order it through them.

So, this week, why not try and reach out to a teen you know and ask them how they are doing with all of the changes? Ask them how they feel about going back to school in the fall? For a lot of teens, it will continue to be distance learning, which is keeping them out of school and away from their friends. Take the time to check in and see if they just may need someone to listen to them. Let me know what you did in the comments below.

Have a good week!

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