Inspiring People – Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart Sitting in Airplane for Featured Photo

Good Morning! Here’s the Monday Morning Blog!

How was your week? Did you get a chance to talk to your teen yet? Try asking them what their favorite color is. You may just start a conversation.

I asked my two young adults what their favorite colors are. One said red and the other said red or black. Red and black were the school colors from the high school they attended. So it makes sense. When we picked out their first cell phones, one was red and one was black. And each kid got their favorite color.

National Women’s History Month

Women's History Month Logo

I’ve been focusing the posts this month on women who have done inspiring things or made contributions to our country’s history. Since there are five Mondays in March, I chose to write about another inspiring woman as a final post for National Women’s History Month, and that woman is Amelia Earhart.

Amelia Earhart, a fellow woman pilot

How many of you know that I’m a pilot? I soloed an airplane, became a private pilot and started an instrument rating. That’s where my training stopped. I came to a point in my life where I needed to focus my money on things other than flying. It wasn’t an easy decision, but since I’d still be a pilot after attaining the certificate, I knew I’d be able to complete training to become current and start flying again, when the time is right.

Amelia Earhart did a lot more flying than I have done. According to AmeliaEarhart.com, when she was ten she saw her first airplane at the state fair and didn’t think much of it. “It was a thing of rusty wire and wood and looked not at all interesting.” She didn’t become interested in avaition until almost a decade later when a little red airplane swooped down towards her and a friend.

Growing up as a tomboy, she wasn’t afraid to take on things that were seen as not being feminine. She kept a scrapbook of newspaper clippings about successful women in male-oreinted fields for inspiration. During my research, I learned she did a lot more than just fly an airplane.

She did other things before her first flight

Did you know that Amelia Earhart…

  • After graduating from Hyde Park High School, she attended a girl’s finishing school. She left in the middle of her second year.
  • She went to work as a nurse’s aide in a military hospital in Canada during World War I.
  • Then attended college and became a social worker at Denison House, a settlement house in Boston.

all before doing her first flight on January 3, 1921.

Denison House contributions

According to Wikpedia.com, Amelia Earhart was hired as a social worker at the Denison House in 1926 and became a full time staff member in 1927. While she was working there as a teacher and home visitor, she was in charge of adult education and supervised a girls program. She was also taking flying lessons to pursue the interest which was sparked in her.

After six months of working, she was able to save up enough money to buy her own airplane, a Kinner Airster.

Photo By John W. Underwood

Here’s what sciencephoto.com had to say about the airplane,

It was very much an experimental proposition. The engine was a Kinner-copy of the Wright Gale, forerunner of the Whirlwind, but it was anything but a success. It threw more oil than it consumed and vibrated excessively. The experience gained from Earhart’s flying helped Kinner build a better engine and by 1930 he was a leader in the field.

Flying takes over

After building flight experience on the weekends, Ameila Earhart received a phone call at work in April of 1928. She originally responded that she was too busy to answer, but finally decided to take a call that would change the course her life was on.

“How would you like to be the first woman to fly the Atlantic?”

Of course she said yes and it led to a flight in a Fokker F7 called Friendship. The flight made headlines world wide, and led to many more flights, during a time when flying was building momentum, especially for women pilots. One of her most famous flights, the one to circumnavigate the world, she never came home from. She disappeared in July of 1937 and what happened to her is still a mystery to be solved.

An interesting story

Every person has a life journey. I’m interested in how people navigate the challenges in their lives to do great things. Amelia Earhart did some amazing things as a woman pilot, but she did other things which made her more than just a pilot. That’s the part of her story I didn’t know before I took a look. Be open to learning about other people. We all have interesting things and experiences to share with each other. If you are interested about learning more about Amelia Earhart, check out her website AmeliaEarhart.com.

My first book – The Hard Way

Cover design of my first book

When Paul Jones meets Anik Hatcher and is introduced to his gang, Paul becomes a key player in their most harmful “prank” yet. He learns how the decisions he makes, good or bad, can quickly affect his whole life. Find out more by picking up your own copy of this teen/young adult read. The Hard Way

If you want to check out the first chapter to see how you like it, sign up for my email list and you’ll have the first chapter delivered to your email.

Have a great week!

Black History Month 2016 – Bessie Coleman

What a journey it has been! When I came up with the idea to write about Black Americans for Black History Month, I thought that I would focus on those women who made a statement in history. I decided to let inspiration take me where it would and I wound up writing about all men so far. From the creator of Black History Month, to the first black fighter pilot, to a man that fought for the rights of blacks, women and the Irish, and finally to the first Black American to play baseball in the major leagues.

For the final week of Black History Month of 2016, I’m going to blog about Bessie Coleman. What was the inspiration this time? I thought back to what my original plan for the Black History Month 2016 blog was and started researching. My interest in aviation drew me to looking at women pilots. When I started reading about Bessie Coleman, I found out there are many similarities between her and Eugene Bullard’s experiences in life and in Aviation. Then I was even more intrigued. Bullard was the first black fighter pilot that I blogged about earlier this month. Coleman and Bullard both broke through the color line, Bullard as a fighter pilot and Coleman as a woman barnstorming pilot. They both were forced to go to France to escape from the discrimination here in the US to do what they wanted to do, Bullard to make a life for himself in a place where he would be respected. Coleman went there to learn how to fly which gave her the tools to pursue her three life goals.

According to AvStop.com, Bessie Coleman was born on January 26, 1892, the 12th of 13 children. Her father, being part Indian, moved back to the Indian territory when Bessie was only seven, leaving her Mom to raise four daughters and a son. To support the family, her Mom picked cotton and took in laundry. The children all helped out and their mom encouraged them to learn as much as they could. Bessie would pick out books from the traveling library to read to her family in the evenings. This is where her quest for knowledge had begun.

Bessie finished high school and attended one semester of college before she had to drop out due to lack of finances. She moved back home for a short stint then headed to Chicago. She had a hard time finding a flight school in the United States that would teach a black person how to fly, much less a woman. So, she did some odd jobs to earn money for a trip to France, where they would teach her.

Part of her drive to fly was due to something her brother had told her. He said that there were many French women already flying planes, and because of her gender and race, she would never be allowed to fly. She eventually earned the money and took French lessons before heading over to France to learn how to fly in a Nieuport Biplane. While in France, Bullard enlisted in the French Foreign Legion. Upon his recovery from being seriously wounded in battle, he volunteered for the French Air Service and received pilot’s license #6950 on May 5, 1917. Bessie proved her brother wrong when she returned to the United States in 1921 as the first black woman pilot to earn a license.

After attaining goal number one, she would now be chasing goal number two, to become a recognized stunt and exhibition flier. Barnstorming was popular in the Roaring ’20s and was the main avenue for women pilots to pursue. It was a form of entertainment where stunt pilots performed aerial tricks. Some of these pilots went from airshow to airshow performing tricks and giving airplane rides to make a living. Again, since no one in the US would teach her the advance skills needed to be a stunt pilot, she went back to France in February of 1922 to complete the advanced flying course. Shortly after she got the training needed, she came back to the US and during Labor Day weekend in 1922 she made her first appearance in an airshow.

Her third goal was to establish a flying school where young black Americans could receive training. She started raising the funds by doing lectures and flying in airshows. In a letter to her sister, Bessie said that she was on the threshold of making this goal a reality too. But, on April 30, 1926 the day before an airshow she was going to fly in, Bessie and her mechanic, William Willis, went to do a test flight. William had some concerns while he flew the plane from Texas to Florida for the show and wanted to check things out. While doing an aerial maneuver, a wrench got caught in the flight controls, which caused it to roll and toss Bessie out of the airplane. Her mechanic was also killed when the plane subsequently crashed into the ground. Due to her death, she would not realize her final goal.

She achieved some things that most people at the time wouldn’t have been able to. Add into the equation that she was a black woman, made what she did even more remarkable. Through her accomplishments, she also became a positive role model for young girls. Her perserverance in battling discrimination helped to pave the way for other woman pilots to achieve their dream to fly, whether they were black or not.

Blogging in honor of Black History Month this year has opened my eyes to the different battles that many blacks had to fight to get where they wanted to be in life. Many people have fought against discrimination to achieve their goals when they are living in a country where they are a minority. Our country’s history seems to have made that achieving more for yourself harder on some, just because they are different.

With all of the different people in this country, we have the ability and resources to do some amazing things. We just need to support and respect each other, regardless of the color of our skin or the language that we speak.

Z is for Zero

Here’s the last letter of the A to Z blogging challenge for 2015. I started with an airplane and wound up with a word that is a symbol of no quantity and is also an important airplane that flew during World War II.

image

Sumerians were the first people to develop a counting system. They used spaces to show the absence of a number as early as four thousand years ago. The first recorded use of a zero like symbol dates back to around the third century B.C. in ancient Babylon.

The spaces made it kind of hard to really know what the number was supposed to be. The zero became the placeholder to replace those spaces. It would become the way to tell the number 10 from the number 100.

Then zero became a concept meaning the absence of any quantity. Zero is a numerical digit that plays a central role in mathematics. It functions as a place holder between the negative and positive numbers on a number line and allows us to perform complicated calculus equations. It’s also an essential part of the binary  code for computers.

Not only does zero play a key role in mathematics, it is also a nickname for an aircraft that was used in World War II. It was a long-range fighter operated by the Japanese Navy from 1940-1945. Named the zero fighter because it entered service for the Imperial Navy in the Imperial year 2600 (1940) and they named it after the last digit of that year. Dr. Jiro Horikoshi was the chief designer of this and many other Japanese fighters.

It was considered one of the most capable carrier based fighters in the world. As a dog fighter in battle, it achieved a legendary kill ratio of 12:1. The Japanese Naval pilots were seen as the best and most experienced naval aviators in the world in late 1941, at the time when Pearl Harbor took place.

There were some inherent flaws in the design of the Zero, but some of those weaknesses were overcome by the ability of the pilots flying them. The aircraft was made very lightweight, because the Japanese industry could only build 800 horsepower engines. It made the plane very maneuverable and easy to fly. It was made for low altitude flying, but above 15000 feet, the controls were less responsive. Because it was so lightweight, it couldn’t carry very heavy ammunition nor could it take very many enemy hits. It also saw having armor plating, parachutes, and self sealing gas tanks as being non-essential extra weight, so the airplane wasn’t equipped with them.

I realize this is a Japanese aircraft and that they were on the other side in the war, but it is very interesting how and why they were made so lightweight and maneuverable. That along with the abilities of the pilots who flew them made these airplanes a worthy opponent of the Allied forces.

So, the zero played both an important role in mathematics and in World War II. The fact that the word zero was the name for a placeholder and what an airplane was nicknamed shows what a contrast a double meaning of one word can have.